Tag Archives: Trauma-Informed Care

Healing Student Trauma: Film Debut, Orange County

paper-tigers-kelsey-movie-creditsSave the date Oct. 14 in Orange County, CA!  It’s the OC’s first screening of James Redford’s “Paper Tigers,” a film on how Lincoln Alternative High heals traumatized students with new relationships.  Such “Trauma-Informed Care” has begun in schools, medical settings, judiciary and social services nationally, with top results. It can help any organization.

Watch the two-minute trailer now: PaperTigersMovie.com

From rough areas, Lincoln High’s students were headed for the “School to Prison Pipeline.”  Then Principal Jim Sporleder took this Walla Walla WA school run by gangs, with 789 suspensions and 50 expulsions a year, and turned it around.  Suspensions fell 85-90%, expulsions fell 30-50%, and attendance, GPAs, and state exam scores rose. Graduation rates rose five-fold. Students got into college with $30K in scholarships. It was so dramatic that Robert Redford’s son James Redford made this film.

On Sept. 19, Mr.  Sporleder and my other friends at ACEsConnection spoke on this work at the White House in Washington. The White House Fact Sheet features ACEsConnection and our 10,000-person organization in its third bullet under “Online Community Support for Educators.”

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“Paper Tigers” Film Screening, Friday, October 14, 7 pm
Center For Spiritual Living, 1201 Puerta Del Sol, San Clemente CA 92673
– A documentary by James Redford, Director –

– Hundreds of screenings already organized nationally –
Admission free. To ensure seats, click “Register” button here.
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How did Principal Sporleder do it?   “Let’s stop asking kids ‘What’s wrong with you?’   Sporleder told his staff — and start asking ‘What happened to you?’  Then, let’s be quiet and listen with compassion.”

If a student used the “F” bomb, instead of detention they saw the principal. “What bad stuff happened that you’re so upset?” Jim would ask. “My Dad left for Iraq, again!” or “Mom’s drunk so no breakfast,” they’d say. They’d pour out their hearts until Jim reached them emotionally and they felt heard. As they could feel and verbalize emotions, they acted out less.

Leveraging the ACE Study

How did Jim Sporleder learn to do all this?  It began when he found out about the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) Study.  The ACE Study revealed that some 50% of Americans suffer childhood trauma, and that it can flood students’ brains with toxic stress to where they can’t learn.

He also found a wealth of resources on ACEsConnection.com, the social network site for the ACE Study just cited by the White House this week.

Then Jim, the school staff and the students all studied the ACE Study together. Everyone saw that the students weren’t freaks, but instead their behavior was their bodies’ natural reaction to horrible experiences over years.  Student self-respect grew.  As Robin Williams told Matt Damon, “It’s not your fault:” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UYa6gbDcx18

The ACE Study and Trauma-Informed Care show that one caring, dependable adult, a teacher or other mentor, can give a kid the relationship they need to heal. Once adults “got them,” the students turned around.

–ACE Study Video by Dr. Vincent Felitti, MD, co-study director: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GQwJCWPG478
–Full story on Lincoln High:  https://acestoohigh.com/2012/04/23/lincoln-high-school-in-walla-walla-wa-tries-new-approach-to-school-discipline-expulsions-drop-85
–Trauma-Informed Care  http://www.samhsa.gov/nctic/trauma-interventions

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Kathy’s blogs explore the journey of recovery from childhood trauma by learning about Adult Attachment Disorder in teens and adults, Adult Attachment Theory, and the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) Study.
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Comments are encouraged, with the usual exceptions; rants, political speeches, off-color language, etc. are unlikely to post.  Starting 8-22-16, software will limit comments to 1030 characters (2 long paragraphs) for a while, until we get new software to take longer comments again.

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Orange County CA First Child Trauma Meeting a Big Success

On April 27, “HIMAG3259 Cherokee El, 5-2-14, James,KB, Dana w. bikeealing Orange County from Childhood Trauma” held its first meeting in Mission Viejo, CA at a local restaurant from 6 to 8 pm. We posted it on Meetup.com as the founding meeting of Orange County (CA) ACEs Connection.  I was honored to co-create the meeting with my dear friend Dana Brown, Southern California director for ACEsConnection.com.

We felt awe as three education activists, six professional trauma therapy providers, individuals suffering child trauma and a total of 12 people already acting as leaders in Trauma-Informed Care and resilience building, filled our table to overflowing.  An additional 15 folks who couldn’t attend due to schedule conflict signed up. That’s a total of 27 compassionate people, all glad to hear that finally there’s action to get ACEs child trauma out of the closet in the upscale, but down in-denial, OC.  My earlier blog on Trauma-Informed Care is here: http://attachmentdisorderhealing.com/trauma-informed-care/

We were all so excited we forgot to take a group photo — in lieu of which above are LA education leader James Encinas, myself, and Dana Brown in May 2014 at San Diego’s model Trauma-Informed Care school Cherokee Point Elementary: https://acestoohigh.com/2013/07/22/at-cherokee-point-elementary-kids-dont-conform-to-school-school-conforms-to-kids/

Everyone requested and donned name tags as we began by asking each to self-introduce.  Folks got so involved that they began asking each other questions around the table and networking on the spot. Soon we were really getting to know each other for more than an hour.

Next, Dana gave an overview of ACEsConnection and the ACE Study. Nearly two-thirds of Americans experience childhood trauma, according to the CDC-Kaiser Permanente Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) Study, she said, and suffer chronic disease, depression and other illnesses because of it. Here’s the short video we posted on the invite (full text of invite is below): http://www.acesconnection.com/blog/ace-study-co-founders-tell-story-on-dvd-here-s-an-intro/

Dana then announced that we’re forming Orange County (CA) ACEs Connection, and asked everyone to please join ACEsConnection.com and then the Orange County group. You are welcome to go to ACEsConnection and join us here: http://www.acesconnection.com/g/orange-county-ca-aces-connection

I stressed that ACEsConnection will be the organizing platform for communication and future meetings; we’re just advertising on Meetup.com like posting an ad in the local paper.

Finally I introduced myself as author of a book and website on the incredible prevalence of attachment disorder and developmental trauma in the US:  http://attachmentdisorderhealing.com/the-silent-epidemic-of-attachment-disorder/

I have the ACE Pyramid linking to ACEsConnection on every page of my website, I said, because ACEsConnection is action-central on the facts about and the healing methods for trauma.

Then all the participants began sharing their eagerness to expand our reach and include many more Orange County residents into the process of bringing hope and healing to our neighborhoods.  One educator proposed a screening of the key documentary on trauma healing “Paper Tigers” at Dana Point’s high school; a professor wants to organize a screening at her university in Irvine; a therapist wants to show it at her trauma clinic; another practitioner wants to screen it at her church.

The group asked unanimously for a second meeting, hopefully on the third or fourth Wednesday of the month, or perhaps in odd-numbered months as the founding group did in San Diego. Three activists volunteered locations for the next meeting; others proposed that ads be put in the local Penny-saver leaflet and/or county paper Orange County Register to build the next meeting.

One leader said publishing a schedule of speeches on specific trauma topics and healing modes is a great way to build meetings. The group was so positive that we may try to create a speakers steering committee at our next meeting to draw up such a list of topics and speakers from among us.

Everyone  was invigorated and looking forward to our next gathering.  Dana and I  will be in touch with everyone for more information on next steps.

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Here’s the text of our Meetup.com advertisement that’s drawn 27 interested participants to date (and growing). Feel free to use it!

Nearly two-thirds of Americans experience childhood trauma, according to the CDC-Kaiser Permanente Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) Study, and suffer chronic disease, depression and other illnesses because of it. Here’s a short video about it: http://www.acesconnection.com/blog/ace-study-co-founders-tell-story-on-dvd-here-s-an-intro/

Is that you, your child, your friend or family member, your student, patient, or client?  It’s likely.

Come meet us to learn how childhood adversity can last a lifetime — but it doesn’t have to.

It’s our first meeting of ACEsConnection in Orange County, CA, part of a growing movement now 8,000+ strong nationally and internationally on the social network http://www.acesconnection.com/

We’d love to see you and hear your story, whether you’re an individual suffering trauma, a service provider, educator, community organizer, concerned parent, or any compassionate human being. By listening, we can see how we might help one another in building resilient communities in Orange County.

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Kathy’s news blogs expand on her book “DON’T TRY THIS AT HOME: The Silent Epidemic of Attachment Disorder—How I accidentally regressed myself back to infancy and healed it all.” Watch for the continuing series each Friday, as she explores her journey of recovery by learning the hard way about Attachment Disorder in adults, adult Attachment Theory, and the Adult Attachment Interview.

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Comments are encouraged with the usual exceptions; rants, political speeches, off-color language, etc. are unlikely to post.  Starting 8-22-16, software will limit comments to 1030 characters (2 long paragraphs) a while, until we get new software to take longer comments again.

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Can School Heal Kids?

Can School Heal Children in Pain? – Guest Blog by “Paper Tigers” Director James Redford, original date June 3 (photo courtesy of Mr. Redford).

aredfordAfter learning about the overwhelming effects of childhood trauma, I decided to make a film about a school that’s adopted a “trauma-informed” lens.

Documentaries are no walk in the park. They take a lot of time and money; they have a way of making a mockery out of your narrative plans…

Why bother? It’s a good question. For me, I have one simple bar that all my films must clear: an “oh my God!” moment. If a story does not elicit that reaction from deep within my bones, I don’t do it. I count on that sense of awe, concern, wonder, and alarm to carry me through the long haul of making the film…

After three years of hard work and uphill battles, my latest documentary film, Paper Tigers, premiered last week [May 28] at the Seattle International Film Festival. And yet it seems like yesterday that I first encountered the explosive research that linked poor health to childhood trauma.

I didn’t know that adverse childhood experiences — like assault, emotional abuse, observing domestic violence — could fundamentally alter a child’s body and brain. These kids are at risk for every single major disease, including (but not limited to) cancer, diabetes, high blood pressure, and cardiovascular disease. That risk doesn’t include the increased likelihood of “self-soothing behaviors” like smoking, drinking, eating too much food, doing too many drugs, having too much sex.

Put that all together and you have the underpinnings for some of the greatest societal challenges we face. It quickly became clear that social support systems require a deeper understanding of adverse childhood experiences….

The good news is that there are schools, clinics, courts, and communities that are starting to adopt a “trauma-informed” lens.

Click to Read More…

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Kathy’s blogs and Guest Blogs explore the journey of recovery from childhood trauma by learning about Adult Attachment Disorder in teens and adults, Adult Attachment Theory, and the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) Study.

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‘Paper Tigers’ Film: ACE Trauma Can Be Healed

“Resilience practices overcome students’ ACEs in trauma-informed high school, say the data” — Guest Blog by Jane Stevens, Founder of ACEsConnection.com

Paper Tigers Cast Crew Seattle Premier 5-28-15Three years ago, the story about how Lincoln High School in Walla Walla, WA, tried a new approach to school discipline and saw suspensions drop 85% struck a nerve. It went viral – twice — with more than 700,000 page views. Paper Tigers, a documentary that filmmaker James Redford did about the school, premiered last Thursday night [May 28] to a sold-out crowd at the Seattle International Film Festival. Hundreds of communities around the country are clamoring for screenings. [Cast and crew of Paper Tigers after Seattle screening; photo by Jane Stevens]

After four years of implementing the new approach, Lincoln’s results were even more astounding: suspensions dropped 90%, there were no expulsions, and kids grades, test scores and graduation rates surged.

But many educators aren’t convinced. They ask: Can the teachers and staff at Lincoln explain what they did differently? Did it really help the kids who had the most problems – the most adverse experiences? Or is what happened at Lincoln just a fluke? Can it be replicated in other schools?

Last year, Dr. Dario Longhi, a sociology researcher with long experience in measuring the effects of resilience-building practices in communities, set about answering those questions.

The results? Yes. Yes. No. And yes.

In 2010, Jim Sporleder, then-principal of Lincoln High, learned about the CDC-Kaiser Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) Study and the neurobiology of toxic stress at a workshop in Spokane, WA. The ACE Study showed a link between 10 types of childhood trauma and the adult onset of chronic disease, mental illness, violence and being a victim of violence…

Here’s what Sporleder learned:

Severe and chronic trauma (such as living with an alcoholic parent, or watching in terror as your mom gets beat up) causes toxic stress in kids. Toxic stress damages kid’s brains. When trauma launches kids into flight, fight or fright mode, they cannot learn. It is physiologically impossible.

They can also act out (fight) or withdraw (flight or fright) in school; they often have trouble trusting adults or getting along with their peers. They start coping with anxiety, depression, anger and frustration by drinking or doing other drugs, having dangerous sex, over-eating, engaging in violence or thrill sports, and even over-achieving.

Sporleder said he realized that he’d been doing “everything wrong” in disciplining kids, and decided to turn Lincoln High into a trauma-informed school.

With the help of Natalie Turner, assistant director of the Washington State University Area Health Education Center in Spokane, WA, Sporleder and his staff implemented three basic changes that essentially shifted their approach to student behavior from “What’s wrong with you?” to “What happened to you?”

Click to Read More…

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Kathy’s blogs and Guest Blogs explore the journey of recovery from childhood trauma by learning about Adult Attachment Disorder in teens and adults, Adult Attachment Theory, and the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) Study.

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What Trauma-Informed Care Means to Me

IMAG3258 James, kid, bike“Rider for Change” James Encinas arrived by mountain bike at San Diego’s Cherokee Point Elementary May 2 to the delight of some hundred students, and visitors from around southern California. James, a career LA school teacher, is riding 3,000 miles from Sacramento to Philadelphia. He’ll take the southern route through Texas and Louisiana, then follow the Underground Railway by which African Americans escaping slavery crossed north to freedom.

James is riding to draw national attention to the need for “trauma-informed schools,” key to the movement for “Trauma-Informed Care (TIC)” in education, health, and all public systems. But what is Trauma-Informed Care, and what’s a trauma-informed school ?  (Hint: all the pix in this blog are from Cherokee Point).

“In medicine, a patient is sent to hospice when all medical procedures have failed, and they’re going to die. That says: we give care and comfort only when nothing else works,”notes Dr. Christopher Germer, psychology prof at Harvard Medical School and co-editor of Mindfulness and Psychotherapy.  Pretty crazy right there, if you consider. Been in a hospital lately? Often you’re a widget; they take your clothes away, don’t tell you what’s happening, and so on. [FN1]

IMAG3250 James, Dana Mom w. FoodBut when treating the real human being, “Care Equals Cure,” says Dr. Germer. If a therapist doesn’t care, he’s not going to cure his client. But it’s also true in any dealings with humans. “Care IS the practice of non-resistance to suffering which dismantles emotional suffering,” says Germer. “It means opening to emotional pain more fully, instead of trying to bypass it. Compassion opens the heart, reveals inner suffering, and makes the suffering available for transformation.” (Above: James and activists carry food donated for kids.)

“So the message is:  Stop fixing,and start caring,” Dr. Germer concludes. In fact, it’s brain science. Comfort, care, compassion reduce so much of a human’s fight-flight reflex, even in major medical pain, that this has been shown to heal surgeries faster. Pain and bodily trauma create enough fight-flight that the brain stem often shuts down the immune system, for one.  Compassion helps it come back online. “Let a wounded soldier talk to his mom and he’ll require 50% less pain meds,” says Dr. Bruce Perry, MD.

But could it be necessary or work well in schools?

History of Trauma-Informed Care (TIC)

IMAG3253 Dana w. Youth LeadersTIC goes back to 1994 when the federal Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) began to study the remarkably high rate of women in the mental health system with histories of physical and sexual abuse trauma. It became clear that, since such clients came in already pre-traumatized, providers should be mindful lest their own practices and policies put the women in danger, physically or emotionally, or lead to re-traumatization. (Activist Dana Brown with youth leaders.)

These and related studies next showed high rates of earlier life trauma in clients seeking services for substance abuse, domestic violence, child welfare and many other areas. In 2005 SAMSHA created the National Center for Trauma-Informed Care (NCTIC) to assist all public programs to implement Trauma-Informed Care, not only in mental health, but in all services including criminal justice and the education system. [FN 2]

“NCTIC seeks to change the paradigm from one that asks, “What’s wrong with you?” to one that asks, “What has happened to you?” says SAMHSA. “Trauma includes physical, sexual and institutional abuse, neglect, inter-generational trauma, and disasters that induce powerlessness, fear, hopelessness, and a constant state of alert…often resulting in recurring feelings of shame, guilt, rage, isolation, and disconnection.”

It’s impossible to successfully  treat human beings in that condition without recognizing this and at least following the principle of “Do No Harm.”  “When a program becomes trauma-informed, every part of its organization and service delivery system is assessed… to include a basic understanding of how trauma affects the life of an individual,”  SAMHSA notes.

IMAG3271 Kids Raise HandsSchools are key, since all Americans are supposed to spend 13 years there. “If fixing school discipline were a political campaign, the slogan would be ‘It’s the Adults, Stupid!’,” says Jane Stevens, founder of ACEsConnection;  “More than three million kids are suspended or expelled each year” in the U.S., 3.4  million in 2006 according to the National Center for Education.  “But punishment doesn’t change behavior; it just drops hundreds of thousands of  kids into a school to prison pipeline.” (Above: Kids ask James questions.)

“Instead of waiting for kids to behave badly then punishing them,  trauma-informed schools are creating environments in which kids can succeed,” she says. It’s about re-training the adults to drop their fears and assume that kids are basically good, but something traumatized them, so they act out. Bad behavior isn’t accepted and it is corrected – by a dialog with kids to hear what’s hurting inside, and show them how to address it. “Focus on altering behavior of teachers and administrators, and kids stop fighting and acting out in class. They’re more interested in school, they’re happier and feel safer,” Stevens says. [FN3]

See the Grade or see the Person?

As SAMHSA began trauma studies in 1994, the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) Study (1994-98) documented a shocker:  about 50% of Americans have significant child trauma. The 17,421 HMO clients studied were privileged to be mostly college-educated, have jobs and good health care. Yet more than half had two of ten types of childhood trauma: physical abuse; sexual abuse; alcoholic or drug addict parent; family member in jail; battered mother; parent with mental illness; loss of a parent; physical neglect, emotional neglect;  or verbal/emotional abuse.

The ACE Study compared their childhoods, to whether they later developed life-threatening physical conditions and/or addictions.  “It found that those 10 types of severe and chronic childhood traumas up the risk of adult onset of major diseases. But it also  increases the chances of being violent, a victim of violence and becoming chronically depressed,” Stevens reports in a terrific post on  Cherokee Point El.  “Brain research revealed one reason: the toxic stress of trauma damages the structure and function of a child’s brain. Kids get anxious and can’t sit still; get depressed and withdraw; get angry and fight; can’t focus and stop learning. They cope with anxiety, depression, anger by drinking, smoking, drugs, fighting, stealing, overeating,  and/or becoming overachievers on their way to being workaholics.”

What about not-so-privileged kids?  Child trauma and its mortal results must affect a far higher percentage of kids in low-income areas with less access to nutrition, health care, and on and on.  A huge percentage of American children suffer trauma, bigger than 50% if we knew the real national average.

IMAG3293 Big GroupMeanwhile many of us privileged middle class kids grow up to be teachers,  administrators, and so on. If we’re traumatized ourselves, we can’t feel our feelings– so we believe that considering “feelings” is idiotic.  Instead, we set up schools as a place to tell kids things.  Because adults talked at us, we think it’s adult to talk at kids. We tell kids they are there to listen to information and repeat it back as we want it, ie. “get the grade,” or face trouble. Enough to put anyone into fight-flight. (James Encinas, left, with students, Principal Godwin Higa, activists.)

I’m from that privileged middle class. I often say, “Nobody beat me or raped me; what’s wrong with me?”

IMAG3306 Higa & Crane AOn Feb. 25 this year, I heard Ruth Beaglehole, founder of Echo Parenting and Education, address Echo’s annual Los Angeles meeting. Urging the 150 professionals present to get passionate about raising awareness of child trauma, she said,  “Kids have to live in the real world? Make the real world non-violent and trauma-sensitive!  What about creating places where children can seek safety, where children can come home to people who open their arms, attune to them, and say ‘Tell me what happened today’. ” (Above: Principal Higa helps Cherokee students make origami cranes for charity.)

“Some people define that as a report card and demand, ‘I want to see your grades.’  Enough of these bloody grades!” Ruth said, to audience laughter, including mine. “Why do we accept this?  Why do we accept that that’s the definition of a person — their grades?”

Suddenly out of nowhere I began violently sobbing at my table full of therapists, about 20 feet from the podium.  “I see you,” Ruth said, looking straight at me. “You don’t have to hold it back.” She saw the real person I am, she didn’t need me to fake anything. She was willing to simply be with me in the pain, as Chris Germer said: “Stop fixing, start caring.” Boy did that feel good. [FN4]

I knew I always hated having to go out and get that grade, and it better be above 90 “or else.”  So I did it, but I lived in fear.  They didn’t see me.  I was a widget who had to produce results or there’d be trouble.

Back story? On Feb. 8, 2011, I’d just heard I might have a thing called “attachment disorder.” Late one night I dragged myself to the sink to wash, listening to a CD by Dr. Henry Cloud. He joked about a lady who didn’t like her husband to go bowling: “She’s not old enough to be dropped off at school.”  But it wasn’t funny.  [FN5]

“That’s it: I wasn’t old enough to be dropped off at school,” I journaled, “I was just dumped off.”  Terrified, I slumped in a heap sobbing, clutching a stuffed dog and a soggy toothbrush.  Rising an hour later, I couldn’t even brush my teeth without holding the dog. “I’m really frightened because I don’t know if this hole under my feet ever ends,” I muttered into my pocket recorder.

I didn’t know last February but read later that Ruth was born in New Zealand to prestigious academic parents who didn’t see Ruth, either.  “I baby-sat since age 12, trying to give to vulnerable children what I didn’t get,” she says.  So she took a BA in early childhood ed, moved to LA, got a Masters in family therapy, and grew Echo Parenting into an agency of 23 staff that trains 100 professionals a year in service.

IMAG3308 Trauma SignWhat if Ruth’s right? What if a school’s whole mission were to look at each child and say “I see you”?  “I see you as a human being, I care how you’re feeling today, and I care what feelings and fears you’re bringing in the door.  I care if you feel threatened even before you walk in the door.  I want to get to know you, the real you who is.  That way we can make you feel safe to be here in school.  And then, you’ll really want to learn!”  (One of many posters students did for James Encinas.)

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Kathy’s news blogs expand on her book “DON’T TRY THIS AT HOME: The Silent Epidemic of Attachment Disorder—How I accidentally regressed myself back to infancy and healed it all.” Watch for the continuing series each Friday, as she explores her journey of recovery by learning the hard way about Attachment Disorder in adults, adult Attachment Theory, and the Adult Attachment Interview.

Footnotes

FN1  Christopher Germer, PhD, “Open Heart, Open Eyes: Self-Compassion,” speech to 20th Annual Conference on Psychology of Health, Immunity and Disease, National Institute for the Clinical Application of Behavioral Medicine (NICABM), Hilton Head SC, Dec.2008
Dr. Germer [http://www.mindfulselfcompassion.org/ and http://www.centerformsc.org/ ] is a founding member of the Institute for Meditation and Psychotherapy, a clinical instructor in psychology at Harvard Medical School, author of The Mindful Path to Self-Compassion, and co-editor of Mindfulness and Psychotherapy. His meditation MP3 are here: http://www.mindfulselfcompassion.org/meditations_downloads.php   “Why Self-Compassion is Becoming a Psychotherapist’s Best Between-Sessions Tool,” Dr. Chris Germer interview by  Dr. Ruth Buczynski, Sept 13, 2009 is at http://www.nicabm.com/nicabmblog/can-self-compassion-become-a-portable-between-session-tool/

FN2  The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) is the agency within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services that leads public health efforts to advance the behavioral health of the nation. Websites on TIC:  http://www.samhsa.gov/nctic/ ; http://www.samhsa.gov/nctic/trauma.asp

FN3  Jane Stevens, ACEsConnection.com and ACEsTooHigh.com:  http://blogs.psychcentral.com/organizations/2014/04/5-reasons-we-struggle-to-be-trauma-responsive-and-why-the-struggle-should-continue/
http://acestoohigh.com/2012/05/31/massachusetts-washington-state-lead-u-s-trauma-sensitive-school-movement/
http://acestoohigh.com/2013/03/20/secret-to-fixing-school-discipline/

FN4 Ruth Beaglehole, founder of Echo Parenting and Education, address to Echo’s annual Los Angeles meeting “Developmental Trauma: Changing the Paradigm,” Feb. 25, 2014

FN5  Dr. Henry Cloud, PhD, “Character Discernment for Dummies, Part 2,” CD, Dec. 6, 2010, www.CloudTownsendResources.com

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